26 victims of RAF cancer: Scots veterans launch legal fight against MoD for years of deadly chemical exposure after cancers ravage their squippers group

Scottish RAF workers are set to launch a multi-million-pound legal fight after being exposed to deadly chemicals which they claim caused cancer.

The Ministry of Defence have been accused of failing to accept responsibility for the horrific illnesses and deaths of 26 former servicemen who were regularly exposed to toxic substances at Scottish air bases.

The airmen and women were part of a specialist branch called “squippers”, who repaired aircrew survival equipment at UK bases including Lossiemouth, Leuchars and Kinloss in the 80s and 90s.

They claim deadly illnesses were caused by daily exposure over years of service to carcinogenic chemicals in poorly ventilated rooms with little or no protective clothing.

Many of the specialist engineers now have various cancers including non-Hodgkin lymphoma, throat cancer and blood cancer.

Read more on the Daily Record

Minister on defensive in Irish Army Air Corps questioning

After a series of revelations in this newspaper, the defence minister addressed the Dáil on air corps health concerns. But he told us what we already knew, writes Joe Leogue.

The Dáil discussion on the health and safety management of dangerous chemicals in the air corps confirmed what we already knew, while leaving a number of questions unanswered.

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Simon Coveney & Enda Kenny were warned of Air Corps concerns

Three whistleblowers warned Enda Kenny and then defence minister Simon Coveney about conditions at the Air Corps headquarters almost a year before the health watchdog issued a critical report on the management of hazardous chemicals at Casement Aerodrome.

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State to fight Irish Army Air Corps toxic exposure lawsuits

The State is facing at least six separate legal actions from former members of the Air Corps who allege they have suffered serious illnesses as a result of “chronic exposure” to the chemicals they came in contact with as a part of their daily duties.

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Health & Safety watchdog warned Irish Army Air Corps about safety risks

The Air Corps was told three months ago it needs to monitor its workers’ exposure to harmful substances, observe their health for early detection, and give them the equipment to protect themselves against chemical exposure.

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Irish Army Air Corps injuries summons lists 26 sample negligence claims

One plaintiff’s summons list contains 26 examples where they claim negligence, including that he was regularly required to use Trichloroethylene without any training as to how to use it, or the proper protective measures required to use it. Medical advice has attributed mental and physical health problems to exposure to such chemicals, writes Joe Leogue.

Read more on the Irish Examiner website