More Irish Army Air Corps compensation claims in the pipeline

The State is facing further claims that Air Corps staff may have suffered illnesses as a result of exposure to harmful chemicals at Casement Aerodrome.

The solicitor representing six people currently taking legal action over their exposure to toxic chemicals confirmed he has received instruction from up to six more workers who are considering submitting personal injury claims.

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Opposition parties to raise Irish Army Air Corps claims in the Dáil

​Opposition parties are to raise whistleblowers’ concerns on the management of air corps staff exposure to hazardous chemicals in the Dáil today.

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Air Corps whistleblowers’ struggle for an investigation

Christmas week 2015, and as the country busied itself preparing for the festive season, Taoiseach Enda Kenny, defence minister Simon Coveney, and junior defence minister Paul Kehoe paid a pre-election visit to Irish troops serving peace-keeping operations in Lebanon and the Golan Heights.

Photographs released from the highly publicised trip saw the Taoiseach and his travelling party don blue helmets as they went to thank the troops and their families for their service.

However, not everyone was impressed with the visit.

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Simon Coveney & Enda Kenny were warned of Air Corps concerns

Three whistleblowers warned Enda Kenny and then defence minister Simon Coveney about conditions at the Air Corps headquarters almost a year before the health watchdog issued a critical report on the management of hazardous chemicals at Casement Aerodrome.

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20 years on from the Brigit McCole Case, Michael Noonan still in power, victims still the enemy…

Letter shows State saw Bridget McCole not as the victim but as the enemy

From the start of his involvement with the aftermath of the hepatitis C debacle, Michael Noonan seemed determined to hold the departmental line. This meant, firstly, insisting that the expert group report published in February 1995 was the last word on the scandal.

Secondly, it involved an insistence that the victims should be compensated through the tribunal established for that purpose rather than through the courts. The tribunal made awards without admission of liability, whereas the courts would seek to establish, in essence, who was to blame.

Read more on the Irish Times website

Ó Snodaigh supports pending court cases being brought by Air Corps personnel